Metal Information

How Do I Store My Jewelry?
When not wearing your jewelry, we highly recommend storing it in a safe place or pouch. This helps prevent scratching and maintains the overall look and appearance of your jewellery. Always remove...
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What Is The Difference Between 10K AND 14K Gold?
The term "karat" designates the amount of gold found in a piece of jewelry. Jewelry is commonly made in 10K, 14K and 18K, as pure gold is mixed with other metals to produce a harder, more workable...
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What Does the "K" Mean When Referring to Gold?
The “K" in 10K and 14K gold refers to the karat of gold. The term "karat" (K) designates the amount of gold found in a piece of jewelry. Pure gold is 24K and signifies 99.9 percent purity, the...
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Why Is My Sterling Silver Jewelry Tarnishing?
Silver tarnishes due to a reaction with something in the environment. Sterling silver could tarnish when exposed to household cleaning products, hair products, some lotions, and even chlorine in the...
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Why Is My Finger Turning Green?
"Green finger" is a reaction to the metal alloys added to genuine silver and gold. Most precious metals are too soft to be used alone in jewelry making, and the added alloys provide the strength and...
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What Is Tungsten?
Tungsten is a chemical element that is mixed with carbide to make affordable jewelry and other items. Tungsten, which means 'heavy stone', is the most scratch-resistant metal known to man. Perfect...
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What Is Hallmarking?
Hallmarking is a way to define the metal content of a piece of jewelry. Metals are tested and if they meet a certain minimal purity requirement they are marked with a specified seal called a...
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What Is Cobalt?
Cobalt is a non-precious metal with a similar appearance to white gold and platinum and is often used to make men's rings and other jewelry. Cobalt is a chemical element found in the Earth's crust...
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What Is Sterling Silver?
Pure silver is a very soft, malleable white precious metal. The sterling silver used to make jewelry contains 92.5% silver and 7.5% of other alloys to give silver the hardness it requires to be...
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My Sterling Silver Jewelry Is Tarnishing. What Should I Do?
Silver tarnishes due to a reaction with something in the environment which causes a chemical reaction on the surface of the metal. Everyday products such as perfumes, colognes, dishwashing soap, hair...
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